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Table of Contents

GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
Preamble
Appendix: How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs
Distribution
Getting Other Versions of Emacs
Introduction
1. The XEmacs Frame
1.1 Point
1.2 The Echo Area
1.3 The Mode Line
1.4 GUI Components
1.5 The XEmacs Menubar
1.6 XEmacs Scrollbars
1.7 XEmacs Mode Lines
1.8 XEmacs Toolbars
1.9 XEmacs Gutters
1.10 Inhibiting Display of GUI Components
1.11 Changing the Position, Orientation, and Appearance of GUI Components
1.12 Using XEmacs Under the X Window System
1.13 Using XEmacs Under Microsoft Windows
2. Keystrokes, Key Sequences, and Key Bindings
2.1 Keystrokes as Building Blocks of Key Sequences
2.1.1 Representing Keystrokes
2.1.2 Representing Key Sequences
2.1.3 String Key Sequences
2.1.4 Assignment of the META Key
2.1.5 Assignment of the SUPER and HYPER Keys
2.2 Representation of Characters
2.3 Keys and Commands
2.4 XEmacs Pull-down Menus
2.4.1 The File Menu
2.4.2 The Edit Menu
2.4.3 The Apps Menu
2.4.4 The Options Menu
2.4.5 The Buffers Menu
2.4.6 The Tools Menu
2.4.7 The Help Menu
2.4.8 Customizing XEmacs Menus
3. Entering and Exiting Emacs
3.1 Exiting Emacs
3.2 Command Line Switches and Arguments
3.2.1 Command Line Arguments for Any Position
3.2.2 Command Line Arguments (Beginning of Line Only)
3.2.3 Command Line Arguments (for XEmacs Under X)
3.3 How XEmacs finds Directories and Files
3.3.1 XEmacs Directory Hierarchies
3.3.2 Package Hierarchies
3.3.3 Directories and Paths
4. Basic Editing Commands
4.1 Inserting Text
4.2 Changing the Location of Point
4.3 Erasing Text
4.4 Files
4.5 Help
4.6 Blank Lines
4.7 Continuation Lines
4.8 Cursor Position Information
4.9 Numeric Arguments
5. Undoing Changes
6. The Minibuffer
6.1 Minibuffers for File Names
6.2 Editing in the Minibuffer
6.3 Completion
6.3.1 Completion Example
6.3.2 Completion Commands
6.3.3 Strict Completion
6.3.4 Completion Options
6.4 Minibuffer History
6.5 Repeating Minibuffer Commands
7. Running Commands by Name
8. Help
8.1 Help Summary
8.2 Documentation for a Key
8.3 Help by Command or Variable Name
8.4 Apropos
8.5 Keyword Search for Lisp Libraries
8.6 Help Mode Commands
8.7 Other Help Commands
9. Selecting Text
9.1 The Mark and the Region
9.1.1 Setting the Mark
9.1.2 Operating on the Region
9.1.3 Commands to Mark Textual Objects
9.1.4 The Mark Ring
9.2 Selecting Text with the Mouse
9.3 Additional Mouse Operations
9.4 Deletion and Killing
9.4.1 Deletion
9.4.2 Killing by Lines
9.4.3 Other Kill Commands
9.5 Yanking
9.5.1 The Kill Ring
9.5.2 Appending Kills
9.5.3 Yanking Earlier Kills
9.6 Using X Selections
9.6.1 The Clipboard Selection
9.6.2 Miscellaneous X Selection Commands
9.6.3 X Cut Buffers
9.6.4 Active Regions
9.7 Accumulating Text
9.8 Rectangles
10. Registers
10.1 Saving Positions in Registers
10.2 Saving Text in Registers
10.3 Saving Rectangles in Registers
10.4 Saving Window Configurations in Registers
10.5 Keeping Numbers in Registers
10.6 Keeping File Names in Registers
10.7 Bookmarks
11. Controlling the Display
11.1 Scrolling
11.2 Horizontal Scrolling
11.3 Selective Display
11.4 Variables Controlling Display
12. Searching and Replacement
12.1 Incremental Search
12.1.1 Slow Terminal Incremental Search
12.2 Non-Incremental Search
12.3 Word Search
12.4 Regular Expression Search
12.5 Syntax of Regular Expressions
12.6 Searching and Case
12.7 Replacement Commands
12.7.1 Unconditional Replacement
12.7.2 Regexp Replacement
12.7.3 Replace Commands and Case
12.7.4 Query Replace
12.8 Other Search-and-Loop Commands
13. Commands for Fixing Typos
13.1 Killing Your Mistakes
13.2 Transposing Text
13.3 Case Conversion
13.4 Checking and Correcting Spelling
14. File Handling
14.1 File Names
14.2 Visiting Files
14.3 Saving Files
14.3.1 Backup Files
14.3.1.1 Single or Numbered Backups
14.3.1.2 Automatic Deletion of Backups
14.3.1.3 Copying vs. Renaming
14.3.2 Protection Against Simultaneous Editing
14.4 Reverting a Buffer
14.5 Auto-Saving: Protection Against Disasters
14.5.1 Auto-Save Files
14.5.2 Controlling Auto-Saving
14.5.3 Recovering Data from Auto-Saves
14.6 Version Control
14.6.1 Concepts of Version Control
14.6.2 Editing with Version Control
14.6.3 Variables Affecting Check-in and Check-out
14.6.4 Log Entries
14.6.5 Change Logs and VC
14.6.6 Examining And Comparing Old Versions
14.6.7 VC Status Commands
14.6.8 Renaming VC Work Files and Master Files
14.6.9 Snapshots
14.6.9.1 Making and Using Snapshots
14.6.9.2 Snapshot Caveats
14.6.10 Inserting Version Control Headers
14.7 Listing a File Directory
14.8 Comparing Files
14.9 Dired, the Directory Editor
14.9.1 Entering Dired
14.9.2 Editing in Dired
14.9.3 Deleting Files With Dired
14.9.4 Immediate File Operations in Dired
14.10 Miscellaneous File Operations
15. Using Multiple Buffers
15.1 Creating and Selecting Buffers
15.2 Listing Existing Buffers
15.3 Miscellaneous Buffer Operations
15.4 Killing Buffers
15.5 Operating on Several Buffers
16. Multiple Windows
16.1 Concepts of Emacs Windows
16.2 Splitting Windows
16.3 Using Other Windows
16.4 Displaying in Another Window
16.5 Deleting and Rearranging Windows
17. World Scripts Support
17.1 Introduction: The Wide Variety of Scripts and Codings in Use
17.2 Language Environments
17.3 Input Methods
17.4 Selecting an Input Method
17.5 Coding Systems
17.6 Recognizing Coding Systems
17.7 Character Set Unification
17.7.1 An Overview of Character Set Unification
17.7.2 Operation of Unification
17.7.2.1 Basic Functionality
17.7.2.2 Interactive Usage
17.7.3 Configuring Unification for Use
17.7.4 Frequently Asked Questions About Unification
17.7.5 Unification Theory
17.7.6 What Unification Cannot Do for You
17.8 Specifying a Coding System
17.9 Charsets and Coding Systems
18. Major Modes
18.1 Choosing Major Modes
18.2 Mode Hook Variables
19. Indentation
19.1 Indentation Commands and Techniques
19.2 Tab Stops
19.3 Tabs vs. Spaces
20. Commands for Human Languages
20.1 Text Mode
20.1.1 Nroff Mode
20.1.2 TeX Mode
20.1.2.1 TeX Editing Commands
20.1.2.2 TeX Printing Commands
20.1.3 Outline Mode
20.1.3.1 Format of Outlines
20.1.3.2 Outline Motion Commands
20.1.3.3 Outline Visibility Commands
20.2 Words
20.3 Sentences
20.4 Paragraphs
20.5 Pages
20.6 Filling Text
20.6.1 Auto Fill Mode
20.6.2 Explicit Fill Commands
20.6.3 The Fill Prefix
20.7 Case Conversion Commands
21. Editing Programs
21.1 Major Modes for Programming Languages
21.2 Lists and Sexps
21.3 Defuns
21.4 Indentation for Programs
21.4.1 Basic Program Indentation Commands
21.4.2 Indenting Several Lines
21.4.3 Customizing Lisp Indentation
21.5 Automatic Display of Matching Parentheses
21.6 Manipulating Comments
21.6.1 Multiple Lines of Comments
21.6.2 Options Controlling Comments
21.7 Editing Without Unbalanced Parentheses
21.8 Completion for Lisp Symbols
21.9 Documentation Commands
21.10 Change Logs
21.11 Tags Tables
21.11.1 Source File Tag Syntax
21.11.2 Creating Tags Tables
21.11.3 Etags Regexps
21.11.4 Selecting a Tags Table
21.11.5 Finding a Tag
21.11.6 Searching and Replacing with Tags Tables
21.11.7 Tags Table Inquiries
21.12 Modes for C, C++, Java and similar languages
21.12.1 Older Modes for C and AWK
21.12.2 Customizing Indentation in CC Mode
21.13 Fortran Mode
21.13.1 Motion Commands
21.13.2 Fortran Indentation
21.13.2.1 Fortran Indentation Commands
21.13.2.2 Line Numbers and Continuation
21.13.2.3 Syntactic Conventions
21.13.2.4 Variables for Fortran Indentation
21.13.3 Comments
21.13.4 Columns
21.13.5 Fortran Keyword Abbrevs
21.14 Asm Mode
22. Compiling and Testing Programs
22.1 Running "make", or Compilers Generally
22.2 Major Modes for Lisp
22.3 Libraries of Lisp Code for Emacs
22.3.1 Loading Libraries
22.3.2 Compiling Libraries
22.4 Evaluating Emacs-Lisp Expressions
22.5 The Emacs-Lisp Debugger
22.6 Lisp Interaction Buffers
22.7 Running an External Lisp
22.8 Packages
22.8.1 Package Flavors
22.8.2 Package Distributions
22.8.3 Binary Packages
22.8.4 Source Packages
22.8.5 Getting Started
22.8.6 Choosing the Packages You Need
22.8.7 XEmacs and Installing Packages
22.8.8 Prerequisites for Building Source Packages
22.8.9 What You Can Do With Source Packages
22.8.10 Normal Packages
22.8.11 Mule Support (mule)
23. Abbrevs
23.1 Defining Abbrevs
23.2 Controlling Abbrev Expansion
23.3 Examining and Editing Abbrevs
23.4 Saving Abbrevs
23.5 Dynamic Abbrev Expansion
24. Editing Pictures
24.1 Basic Editing in Picture Mode
24.2 Controlling Motion After Insert
24.3 Picture Mode Tabs
24.4 Picture Mode Rectangle Commands
25. Sending Mail
25.1 The Format of the Mail Buffer
25.2 Mail Header Fields
25.3 Mail Mode
26. Reading Mail
26.1 Calendar Mode and the Diary
26.1.1 Movement in the Calendar
26.1.1.1 Motion by Integral Days, Weeks, Months, Years
26.1.1.2 Beginning or End of Week, Month or Year
26.1.1.3 Particular Dates
26.1.2 Scrolling the Calendar through Time
26.1.3 The Mark and the Region
26.1.4 Miscellaneous Calendar Commands
26.2 LaTeX Calendar
26.2.1 Holidays
26.2.2 Times of Sunrise and Sunset
26.2.3 Phases of the Moon
26.2.4 Conversion To and From Other Calendars
26.3 Supported Calendar Systems
26.4 Converting To Other Calendars
26.5 Converting From Other Calendars
26.5.1 Converting from the Mayan Calendar
26.5.2 The Diary
26.5.3 Commands Displaying Diary Entries
26.5.4 The Diary File
26.5.5 Date Formats
26.5.6 Commands to Add to the Diary
26.5.7 Special Diary Entries
26.5.8 Customizing the Calendar and Diary
26.5.8.1 Customizing the Calendar
26.5.8.2 Customizing the Holidays
26.5.8.3 Date Display Format
26.5.8.4 Time Display Format
26.5.8.5 Daylight Savings Time
26.5.8.6 Customizing the Diary
26.5.8.7 Hebrew- and Islamic-Date Diary Entries
26.5.8.8 Fancy Diary Display
26.5.8.9 Included Diary Files
26.5.8.10 Sexp Entries and the Fancy Diary Display
26.5.8.11 Customizing Appointment Reminders
26.6 Sorting Text
26.7 Running Shell Commands from XEmacs
26.7.1 Single Shell Commands
26.7.2 Interactive Inferior Shell
26.7.3 Shell Mode
26.7.4 Interactive Inferior Shell with Terminal Emulator
26.7.5 Term Mode
26.7.6 Paging in the terminal emulator
26.8 Narrowing
26.9 Hardcopy Output
26.10 Recursive Editing Levels
26.11 Dissociated Press
26.12 CONX
26.13 Other Amusements
26.14 Emulation
27. Customization
27.1 Minor Modes
27.2 Behaviors
27.3 Variables
27.3.1 Examining and Setting Variables
27.3.2 Easy Customization Interface
27.3.2.1 Customization Groups
27.3.2.2 Changing an Option
27.3.2.3 Customizing Faces
27.3.2.4 Customizing Specific Items
27.3.3 Editing Variable Values
27.3.4 Local Variables
27.3.5 Local Variables in Files
27.4 Keyboard Macros
27.4.1 Basic Use
27.4.2 Naming and Saving Keyboard Macros
27.4.3 Executing Macros With Variations
27.5 Customizing Key Bindings
27.5.1 Keymaps
27.5.2 Changing Key Bindings
27.5.2.1 Changing Key Bindings Interactively
27.5.2.2 Changing Key Bindings Programmatically
27.5.2.3 Using Strings for Changing Key Bindings
27.5.3 Disabling Commands
27.6 The Syntax Table
27.6.1 Information About Each Character
27.6.2 Altering Syntax Information
27.7 The Init File
27.7.1 Init File Syntax
27.7.2 Init File Examples
27.7.3 Terminal-Specific Initialization
27.8 Changing the Bell Sound
27.9 Faces
27.9.1 Customizing Faces
27.10 Xft Font Customization
27.11 Frame Components
27.12 X Resources
27.12.1 Geometry Resources
27.12.2 Iconic Resources
27.12.3 Resource List
27.12.4 Face Resources
27.12.5 Widgets
27.12.6 Menubar Resources
27.13 Quitting and Aborting
27.14 Dealing With Emacs Trouble
27.14.1 Recursive Editing Levels
27.14.2 Garbage on the Screen
27.14.3 Garbage in the Text
27.14.4 Spontaneous Entry to Incremental Search
27.14.5 Emergency Escape
27.14.6 Help for Total Frustration
27.15 Reporting Bugs
27.15.1 When Is There a Bug
27.15.2 How to Report a Bug
Glossary
The GNU Manifesto
What's GNU? GNU's Not Unix!
Why I Must Write GNU
Why GNU Will Be Compatible With Unix
How GNU Will Be Available
Why Many Other Programmers Want to Help
How You Can Contribute
Why All Computer Users Will Benefit
Some Easily Rebutted Objections to GNU's Goals
Key (Character) Index
Command and Function Index
Variable Index
Concept Index


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